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Media BuyingSee All

August 14, 2018

Seasonality in media-buying

As discussed in a prior article, clearance in remnant TV buying is influenced by various factors. Timing is one of those factors, and often manifested in patterns of seasonality. We will demonstrate this with real data between 2016 and 2018. To generally learn more about media-buying, and what the term “clearance” means, we refer you to this blog post. 

August 1, 2018

Let's get clear on clearance. And pricing.

Pricing and clearance are two pillar concepts, deeply intertwined, in remnant TV media-buying. This post will focus on the former, and in particular the challenges that come with predicting clearance.

June 28, 2018

Swinging for the fences: a Hubble Contacts story

It was Thursday, October 19, and Ben and Jesse, founders of Hubble Contacts, had just come off their weekly call with Tatari. They had been running TV advertising since spring that year, and that day presented a defining moment: Tatari had recommended that Hubble Contacts purchase spots on the World Series. The Astros were playing the Dodgers in the first game the following week, on Tuesday, October 24. With each spot commanding a near 6-digit-dollar figure, this would be the biggest and ballsiest play yet for Hubble.

May 22, 2018

Choosing between local and national advertising

Advertisers often assume that airing on local TV is cheaper. While local spot costs are indeed less expensive than national buys, the number of local impressions aired is much smaller. To address this difference, a good apples-to-apples comparison can be made by quantifying both type of buys as a CPM (cost per thousand impressions). This comparison is insightful because local TV CPMs tend to be notably higher than national TV CPMs, often by orders of magnitude. For the sake of completeness, we should point out that there is no universal local CPM. Local CPMs vary by geography since audiences can be vastly different from one location to another (e.g. different average household income).

May 2, 2018

Brand and direct-response TV ads

TV ads so far have always been classified as either brand or direct-response (DR). We will discuss the typical features of both types and show that a third (hybrid) option is also feasible.

MeasurementSee All

May 30, 2018

The importance of creative de-bias in TV measurement

In the remnant TV market, advertisers typically place media buys on a weekly basis and have no guarantee of clearance. Furthermore, spots aired are seen by all viewers, as opposed to online ads in digital marketing in which random samples of viewers see different ads. This makes it difficult to execute a perfect creative test construct. What usually happens is that different creatives end up being distributed across different networks, and occasionally with different spend. Furthermore, with the introduction of new creatives in the mix, advertisers often encounter a scenario in which some creatives aired on certain networks, while the newer ones did not (or vice versa). The impact of network-rotation variability and imperfect creative split should therefore not to be ignored, as it can greatly affect the measured performance of creatives. This is what we refer to as ‘creative bias.’

May 16, 2018

Difficulties of measuring conversions on linear TV

In advertising, conversion is a step in the marketing funnel during which website (or app-store) visitors perform a desired action (e.g. they purchase a product, become subscribers, etc.). It is usually expressed a percentage. For example, a 5% conversion rate means that for every 100 website visits (or app downloads), 5 people will purchase a product. Because it directly shows how many people became customers as a result of being exposed to an ad, it allows for calculation of the customer acquisition cost (CAC), and every marketer therefore wants to measure it correctly.

March 14, 2018

Measuring the delayed response of a TV campaign

To date, TV advertising campaigns have been bucketed in two groups: either direct response (DR) or brand. The general opinion was that campaigns must exclusively belong to one or the other. Many advertisers think that DR ads are meant to drive responses and cannot build brand, or vice versa. This is, however, an antiquated notion. DR and brand can live within the same campaign or creative, and each can be objectively measured.

January 15, 2018

TV advertising measurement: Two steps forward, one step back

To date, TV has mostly been measured through a baseline and lift model. It is a framework that works well for linear TV, since many people watch the same program and advertisements at the same time. As such, even if only a small fraction of viewers responded to the ad, the lift is still visible and noticeable above the baseline.

December 28, 2017

How to measure TV performance?

TV advertising used to be a “spray and pray” process. Advertisers would purchase very expensive spots based on intuition (for instance, buying networks and shows simply because they are popular) without knowing whether these spots would work for them. Media agencies did not offer continuous testing and measurement, so advertisers had to stick with the same choices (and financial commitments) and hope for the best.

EngineeringSee All

March 28, 2018

Filtering bot traffic from non-TV platforms

In one of our earlier blog articles, we discussed why TV advertising is immune to bot traffic issues that affect many digital platforms. Bots generate fake clicks on websites and never lead to sales (as there is no human behind these clicks), and therefore falsely suggest that a marketing campaign is performing. TV, on the other hand, isn’t impacted by bot traffic for two reasons: (1) bots can’t generate fake TV ad impressions, and (2) they don’t fake traffic on the advertiser’s website at the exact time of a TV ad airing.    

PeopleSee All

August 8, 2018

Katie Miltimore: Media Ops Associate

Katie joined Tatari in July this year.  We thought it would be fun to get her first impressions of working at the company.  And perhaps have her share a word of advice for college students, too.

July 24, 2018

Thanks, Koosh!

Last week, some of our SF team decided to surprise one of our remote colleagues, Koosh, in Capitola CA. Koosh is an early (!) Tatari software engineer and the person behind quite a few essential features, such as our pixel technology and related data warehousing, from setup to scaling (just to give you a taste, Tatari captures over a billion events monthly).

June 15, 2018

Tatarians volunteer at the GLIDE Foundation

On June 13, during our mid-year company get-together, Tatarians volunteered at the GLIDE Foundation and participated in the "Daily Free Meals Program," preparing and serving food to the community of San Francisco.

June 8, 2018

Tatari at the IRCE 2018

On Wednesday and Thursday, Tatari exhibited at the Internet Retailer Conference and Exhibition in Chicago—its first trade show since launching in 2016! We had a great time talking to advertisers and demoing our product to companies who were interested in launching TV. We had a small, but wonderfully designed, 10x10 booth that was a frequent stopping point for both the exhibitors and the retailers attending the conference.

March 30, 2018

Want to join Tatari? Do your homework first.

If there’s one certainty in the Silicon Valley, it’s that the success of a startup highly correlates to its people. I didn’t realize this when I started my first company, Shazam, in late 1999. Our initial team of twenty was mostly hired from inside our network, and I would generally describe them as top-performers (and many of them have indeed gone out to start their own companies). The next set of hires at Shazam came through traditional recruiting and interviewing. This process, however, did not allow us to separate the A+ players from the A players, and the difference was meaningful. For example, I have firsthand seen how an A+ software engineer will easily do the work of three A-caliber engineers. Only when a person was six months or so in the job, we would be able to tell whether he or she was “the best” or “great” (“good” would not be hired), and the outcome felt like a mere draw of luck.